Today is IPv6 party time so let’s celebrate with a blog post !

Reliable IPV6 connectivity is no longer just nice to have – it is a necessity. If your Internet access provider still does not offer proper native IPv6 connectivity, your next best choice is to use an IPv4 tunnel to an IPv6 point of presence. It works and on the client side it only requires this sort of declaration in /etc/network/interfaces :

auto ipv6-tunnel-he
  iface ipv6-tunnel-he inet6 v4tunnel
  address 2001:170:1f12:425::2
  netmask 64
  gateway 2001:170:1f12:425::1

Of course, the same sort of configuration is required at the other endpoint – which means that, among other parameters, you must inform the IPv6 tunnel server of the IPv4 address of the client endpoint. Hurricane Electric, my tunnel broker lets me do that manually through its web interface – which is fine for a static configuration done once, but inadequate if your Internet access provider won’t supply you with a static IPv4 address. By the way, even if, after a few weeks of use, you believe you have a static address, you might just have a dynamic address with a rather long DHCP lease…

But Hurricane Electric also provides a primitive HTTP API that lets you inform the tunnel broker of IPv4 address changes – that is all we need to do it automatically every time our Internet access goes up. Adding this wget command to the uplink configuration stanza in /etc/network/interfaces does the trick :

auto eth3
iface eth3 inet dhcp
  up wget -O /dev/null

That’s it – you now can count on IPv6 connectivity, even after a dynamic IPv4 address change.

And after you are done, go test your IPv6 configuration and your IPv6 throughput !